Scott Wegener is a multi award-winning creative writer who believes in looking on the lighter side of life’s predicaments but still values how serious life is. This site features a wide variety of Scott's published and performed works. If you want to use any of these pieces, or commission something origional, contact Scott Wegener

Apr 6, 2013

Jesus Juice

Performances: Lilydale Seventh-day Adventist Church - April 6, 2013
Edinburgh College Chapel - March 3, 2015
Edinburgh College Arts Evening - November 10, 2015
The brief given to Scott: A short play on witnessing, sharing Jesus with those around us

[Person walks in (“Juice”) with a bottle full of juice. Another (“Empty 1”) walks towards them with an empty bottle. Juice quickly hides his full bottle as not to draw attention that he has juice and they don’t. ]

Empty 1: Hi

Juice: Hi

Empty1: Doing anything on the weekend?

Juice: [hesitant to share they go to church] Umm, Not really.

Empty: Me neither, maybe we can go to the footy on Saturday.

Juice: [hesitant to share they go to church on Sabbath] oh, err, mmmm.


Empty:  I'll chat later.

Juice: [relieved] Right, see ya.

[Empty 1 leaves, Empty 2 enters with empty bottle, Juice hides bottle again]

Empty 2: Hey, I haven’t’ seen you in ages. What are you up to these days? Still the party animal I remember?

Juice: Nah. How bout you?

Empty2: I’m struggling actually. One day at a time. There's gota be more to life than this.

Juice: Yeah, ummm, well.

Empty2:  Good to see you.

Juice: [relieved]  Right, see ya.

[Empty 2 leaves, Empty 3 enters, Juice hides bottle again]

Empty 3: Hi

Juice: Hi, how’s it going?

Empty 3: Not great, my dad died the other week,

Juice: Oh no.

Empty3: Oh well, he’s happy now, he’s probably looking down on me now if the Christians are right, eh.

Juice:  Right, ummm, I'm not sure that  . . .

Empty 3: Well gota run.

Juice: [relieved] Righto, see you later.

[Empty 3 leaves - TRUMPET SOUNDS, Juice proudly pulls out his full bottle of juice and lines up behind a few others who beat him to the front of the line with just a tiny bit of juice in their bottle. Empty 1,2,3 come out to see what’s happening and join the end of the line behind juice, Angel meets first in the line]

Angel: Greetings, Do you have Jesus in your life?

Tiny Juice 1: I do, only I have shared much of Him with my friends

Angel: Well done good and faithful servant, you may all enter.

[Juice approaches, adjusts their tie tighter and all excited]

Angel: Greetings, Do you have Jesus in your life?

Juice: I do, check this out!

Empty 1,2,3: [ all gasp] Where did you get all that from?

Juice: [proudly] Bible study and prayer.

Angel: You may enter

[Juice steps other side of Angel but waits, looking back]

Angel: Greetings, Do you have Jesus in your life?

Empty 1: Umm no,
Empty 2: but we’re with him.
Empty 3: He has lots of Jesus.

Angel: I’m sorry, the opportunity for sharing Jesus has now finally passed.

Empty 1: But, we didn’t know about this:
Empty 2: [to Juice] How come you never told us we needed Jesus?
Empty 3: Yeah, why didn’t you say something. . .

Angel: I am sorry.  We delayed as long as we could. The time has indeed now passed.

[Angel walks off, Juice lingers, shrugs shoulders slowly as there's nothing he can do now and mouths 'sorry', then walks off. Empties walk out other door bemused.]

Empty 3: Now what’s going to happen to us?



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

There is some confusion as to why the lady still got to go to heaven with seemingly no ill consequences from not sharing Jesus with her friends. It is human nature to feel the ending is an injustice.

Here's an explanation.

In the drama, a devout Christian lady loves Jesus, but does not have the courage to share Jesus with her friends.
"What would they say or think if I brought up Jesus in conversation?", she thinks. Her friends are atheists who have no love for Jesus and have not accepted the gift of salvation on offer to all. In fact, they live quite a worldly life, the opposite of what a genuine Christian might, (or should).

And yet the Christian gets to go to heaven, despite her seemingly selfish behaviour.
She wants her friends in heaven, though just isn't courageous enough to speak up.
In the end, when the end arrives, her friends are upset she never shared her knowledge with them. And why wouldn't you, now facing death.
Would they all have become christians if she had said something - we will
never know.

What about your friends? Have you shared Jesus with ALL your friends and frequent acquaintances. If not, should you be allowed into heaven if the trumpet of God sounds at the end of this sentence?
You would be the same as the lady who had not told all her friends about Jesus.

If you have accepted Jesus in your life, I say "yes!".
It is not by works, or earning, that we gain an eternity with our creator, but grace, simple acceptance of having Jesus stand in replacement of our sinful lives.

This drama represents how you don't need to earn your way to heaven, but having said that, you can have an eternal impact with your actions, or inactions, along he way.

Bringing people to heaven is the ultimate treasure on earth. The only treasure you can take with you and what God longs for most. People. His creations.

The lady failed along the way. Who does not sin along the way? You or I?
Is her sin any worse than something you or I might do?
And yet we can all be saved, thanks to grace.

Amazing grace? Indeed!

The challenge, now, knowing you are saved; step up and share Jesus while you still have the chance.

COPYRIGHT

Scott Wegener holds the copyright to this piece, along with everything else on www.ScottPublished.com , but he may well let you use it elsewhere, just ask!
This was written by Scott Wegener to accommodate a specific brief. If you want something written specifically for your needs, just ask for a quote!